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Bat House PlansEdit

This plan is a single chamber bat house plan. It's 26 inches high and 24 inches wide, and it is the simplest plan provided by Bat Conservation International (BCI). http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/SingleChamberBHPlans.pdf

This bat house has a total of four chambers. It is much larger than the single chamber house, and is more difficult to construct. These plans are also provided by BCI. http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/FourChamberNurseryHousePlans.pdf

If you are unsure how dark the paint or stain needs to be for your bat house, check this map from BCI: http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/ColorRecs.pdf

The types of bat most likely to inhabitat these bat houses, depending on where you live, are

  • Pallid Bat (western and southwestern US, southcentral British Columbia)
  • Big Brown Bat (all of US and Canada except southern Florida and southcentral Texas)
  • Florida Bonneted Bat (southern Florida)
  • Pallas's Mastiff Bat (Florida Keys)
  • South-Eastern Myotis (Gulf Coast states)
  • Long-Eared Myotis (southwestern Canada and western US)
  • Little Brown Myotis (most of Canad and nothern US)
Bathouse

After installing the bat house, it is important to make sure that nothing besides bats take up residence. Wasps can be a particular nuisance. While bats can co-exist peacefully with wasps, too many wasps can force bats to abandon a house. Co-existing also works only when there are multiple chambers in one house, because a wasp sting can kill a bat. Mad-daubers, a type of wasp, can also take up too much space inside the house leaving little room for bats.

To get rid of these pests, wait until evening or winter when all of the bats are gone, including the pups (baby bats). Then take a yard stick or broom handle to knock out all the nests. To prevent massive nest build-up, it is best to check your bat house routinely. For more information on wasps inside your bat house, click here to see the official BCI instructions: http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/Bat%20HousesandWasps.pdf

Installing a Bat HouseEdit

This plan from BCI describes how to attach a bath house to a building in three different ways; horizontal rails, vertical rails, and french cleats. http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/InstallingYourBatHousebuilding.pdf

Another way to set up a bat house is to mount it on a pole. The directions on how to do so described by BCI are here: http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/InstallingYourBatHouseWoodenPostSteel%20Pole.pdf

Bat House FAQ'sEdit

http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/fof_bathouse.pdf

If You Have Bats in Your HomeEdit

http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/bathouses/fof_ug.pdf

BibliographyEdit